evan williams green, black and white label

Bottle:

I have three small square mickies, each with a green, black or white label. They don’t differ much from each other. The difference between the bottles is the color of label and screw top plastic lids. Each bottle has differing alcohol content and they all proudly state the evan Williams motto: kentuckys 1st distiller.

Green-

Alc. 40%

Nose:

Aromatic with fresh ripe banana, this is a very floral bourbon. Simple and straight forward, somewhat plain. The tell tale notes of bourbons cherries and coconut are somewhat subtle, hidden behind some bitterness. The char seems to overcome the fruit.

Palate:

A bit bitter and charred tasting. Wood overbalances grain. Light flavor but a pleasant texture of cream. Char, corn, roasted nuts with some white pepper throughout. A drop of apple juice. A bit minty on the quick finish with what seems like a touch of raw potato.

Overall:

A drop of water or an ice cube would absolutely decimate the fruit in this. Already too overpowered by barrel notes, this is a mixing friendly bottle.

score: 84

Black-

Alc. 43%

Nose:

The nose is really fruit forward here. Getting past the banana, we have some pulsing red licorice that fades to real red cherries with just a drop of pickle. Smells creamy and sweet with the green labels bitterness flushed away. Very floral and peachy. Some mesquite and a little cleaning chemical. Overall very pleasant nose.

Palate:

Starts with cherry lozenges, finishes currant. Thick, palate filling, creamy and full. Black pepper throughout, with corn and barrel working very nicely together. Ashes, flowers and fruit.

Overall:

Probably the most enjoyable out of the three. A contemplative sip.

score: 90

White:

Alc. 50%

Nose:

Tight nose of wood and vanilla. The high abv keeps it less aromatic than the others, but more true to smell. Caramel, brown sugar and fruity corn notes. Slightest candied cherry with a little dust. No banana, but a touch of butter.

Palate:

Hay, char, burnt corn, toffee and a white pepper start. Mint leaf, dust and flowers. Much more closed than the other offerings, but tastes more rewarding. Smooth and oily palate. Cough lozenges.

Overall:

The blender enjoyed these barrels the most because they are the closest to the original taste, before dilution. The high abv keeps the profile true. This is bold and loud. Good quality.

score: 90

Please note:

These bottles are all the same mash bill. The difference between the three is that they are blended differently. All three are aged 5 – 7 years, but the least valuable barrels go to the green label, being the bargain blend. The black label is the standard blend and the white is the premium blend.

The label does read ‘kentucky’s 1st distiller’ but that may not be true. Shoddy record keeping and illegal business has lead to the loss or destruction of most of the north American distillers historical notes. Todays evan Williams distillery wasn’t built until the mid 1900’s and is claimed to not even be part of the evan Williams distillers family. Some travel records indicate evan Williams the distiller may have not even been in America at the time of 1794.

We may never know who Americas first distiller ever was.